Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)

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LPG is the name originally given by the oil industry to a mixture of
petroleum hydrocarbons principally propane and butane and mixtures of the two.
LPG is used as a clean fuel for domestic and industrial purposes. These gases may
be converted to the liquid form and transported in one of three conditions:


(1) Solely under pressure at ambient temperature.
(2) Fully refrigerated at their boiling point (-30°C to –48°C).
(3) Semi-refrigerated at reduced temperature and elevated pressure.

A number of other gases with similar physical properties such as ammonia,
propylene and ethylene are commonly shipped on LPG carriers. These gases are
liquefied and transported in the same conditions as LPG except ethylene which
boils at a much lower temperature (-104°C) and which is therefore carried in
the fully refrigerated or semi-refrigerated condition.

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